10 Best & Worst Airports in the US for Holiday Travel

This may be the most wonderful time of the year, but the words “holiday travel” can strike fear into the hearts of many. Whether you’re flying out for Thanksgiving or sometime during December, holiday travel usually means long lines, crowded airports, and delays upon delays. At Elite Fixtures, we’re about all things home, including home for the holidays. So, we decided to conduct a study into best and worst airports, airlines, and days for holiday travel.

For this study, we used government data to analyze the 50 busiest airports and all flights departing from them during the week of Thanksgiving and the last two weeks of December over the last five years (2012 – 2016). We looked for the percentage of flights delayed, the average time of delay, and the percentage of flights cancelled.

Here are our findings:

When it came to airports during the last two weeks of December, Texas has a problem. Three of their biggest airports, Dallas/Fort Worth, Dallas Love Field, and William P. Hobby (Houston), are all in the top 10 worst airports, with William Hobby in the top spot. William Hobby had 42% of all flights delayed, 1.3% cancelled, and an average delay time of 46 minutes. Oakland International, ranked number two, was similar with 42% delayed, 0.6% cancelled, and a 46-minute average delay.

Map of the 10 worst airports in the US for Christmas travel

Chart of the 10 worst airports in the US for Christmas travel

For the worst days of travel during the last two weeks of the year, the 27th and the 23rd were the two worst days. They each had 34% of flights delayed and a 59-minute average delay time. The 27th had a higher percentage of cancelled flights at 2.3 compared to 1% for the 23rd.

The 5 worst days to fly for Christmas travel

As far as the worst airlines, Southwest came in at the number one spot. Frontier, Spirit, Jetblue, and United round out the top five.

The 5 worst airlines in the US for Christmas travel

When it came to the best for Christmas travel, Honolulu came in as the best airport. They had only 12% of flights delayed and 0.6% cancelled. However, they did have an average of 60 minutes for delays. A few major airports made the best list as well, including Ronald Reagan in D.C., Detroit Metropolitan Airport, and Seattle-Tacoma International.

Map of the 10 best airports in the US for Christmas travel

Chart of the 10 best airports in the US for Christmas travel

We found the best day to travel would be on Christmas itself. It would be up to you to decide if the tradeoff is worth it. Eighteen percent of flights on Christmas were delayed and 1.7% were cancelled. New Year’s Eve was the second-best day, and Christmas Eve was third.

The 5 best days to fly for Christmas travel

Many of the smaller airlines made the list for best during this timeframe. Hawaiian Airlines was the top airline, followed by Alaska Airlines, Mesa Airlines, Delta, and Endeavor.

The 5 best airlines in the US for Christmas travel

We also looked at the some of the worst airports and airlines for Thanksgiving travel. There were some definitely similarities when compared to December travel. Looking at the worst airports, Midway in Chicago was the ranked the worst for Thanksgiving but also made the Christmas list. William P. Hobby, Dallas/Fort Worth, Oakland, Dallas Love Field, Newark Liberty, and Denver also made both lists.

Map of the 10 worst airports in the US for Thanksgiving travel

Chart of the 10 worst airports in the US for Thanksgiving travel

For the worst airlines, Southwest again took the top spot. While the percentages were lower than December travel, it still was the worst among airlines. Frontier, Jetblue, Envoy, and Delta rounded out the top five — very similar to the December list.

If you’re headed somewhere else for the holidays, chances are you’re going to have to endure some travel woes. Whether that’s traffic on the road or delays at the airport, you’re not alone in your struggle to get there. Hopefully, you won’t be heading through one of the airports on our worst airports list. From all of us at Elite Fixtures, safe travels and happy holidays.

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Elite Fixtures' Sustainability Scholarship

$1,000 Eco-Friendly Sustainability Scholarship

Elite Fixtures' Sustainability Scholarship

Want $1,000 for college? Elite Fixtures can help make that happen.

If you are currently enrolled in college or headed there in 2017 and want to win a $1000 scholarship to help cover expenses, consider entering the Elite Fixtures Scholarship Contest. Elite Fixtures will award a $1000 scholarship to a highly motivated student who can thoughtfully write about sustainability and how they practice green living.

THE PROMPT:

We are committed to sustainable living at Elite Fixtures, providing numerous energy efficient options for the home. In 600 words or less, tell us about what sustainability means to you and why it is important to society as a whole. Then, explain how you practice sustainability or ‘green-living’ in your own life.

HERE’S HOW YOU WIN:

  • Fill out the form below, including a link to your essay using Google Docs. Remember to change the settings so it is viewable to anyone
  • Follow all directions in the prompt.
  • We will pick a winner on December 9, 2017 and notify you. (It’s subjective; we’re going to pick our favorite response.)
  • We will email you to confirm mailing address, and send you a check, or Visa gift card in the mail for $1000.
  • We will announce the winner on our company blog.

TO BE ELIGIBLE:

  • You must be a graduating senior in high school or a freshman, sophomore, or junior in college.
  • You must be graduating high school or in college and between the ages of 16 and 22.
  • We reserve the right to verify the date of your high school graduation and/or college enrollment.
  • Any and all content may be used in future Elite Fixtures marketing.

HOW TO ENTER:

Fill out the form below:

Submissions must be received by midnight on December 8, 2017.

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Energy Beliefs Affect Household Conservation Habits

Baby Boomers vs. Millennials: A Look at Energy Usage and Climate Change

Being environmentally conscious is a hot topic today with most individuals reporting some serious social pressure to reduce, reuse and recycle whenever possible. This means trying to be conscious of your daily habits and conserve energy whenever possible.

Many people would consider their home to be an oasis of sorts. It’s a place to do whatever you want without judgement. For this reason, we thought it might be interesting to learn about the household habits of people across the US. We wanted to see what happens behind closed doors. Are American citizens reducing their energy usage, or do they throw caution to the wind and continue on with their traditional behaviors? We conducted a survey to find out their household habits and our findings are below.

The first thing we thought we should uncover was whether or not individuals even believed that there was a problem in our world that should cause them to conserve energy in the first place. It turns out that people aged 18-24 are the most likely to believe in human-impacted climate change.

We discovered that people who don’t believe that climate change is caused by humans are the least likely to intentionally conserve energy.

Energy Beliefs Affect Household Conservation Habits

Residents of some states are more willing to make an effort to conserve energy over the coming year. Oregon, New Hampshire, Tennessee, Utah, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Wisconsin were the states with the residents who were most willing to change their habits. Arizona was the least likely state to make a conscious effort to change their household habits for the environment.

What does the gender breakdown look like? Of those survey respondents that stated they would not make a conscious effort to be green this year, men were the larger share of the pie, with males twice as likely as females to say they wouldn’t make an effort.

Energy Conservation Habits by Gender

When it comes to household chores, how often are Americans engaging in these necessary activities?

While dishwashers (especially older ones) require a large amount of energy to heat water and sanitize dishes, the majority of Americans report using their dishwasher multiple times a week.

Household Dishwasher Usage per Week

Compared to getting the dishes clean, the majority of survey respondents report doing laundry just once per week.

Household Laundry Habits

And what about vacuuming? While the majority reported that vacuuming takes place about once per week, 10% of respondents admitted they NEVER vaccuum their home. Hopefully, they are using a swiffer or a mop — you’ve got to keep those floors clean somehow!

Household Vacuuming Habits

Interestingly, despite the fact that older Americans tend to live in larger homes than millennials, many of their household habits are similar. A much larger home doesn’t significantly impact the frequency of chores.

Home Sizes for Millennials vs Baby Boomers

While most of these household chores are necessary to keep a home clean and organized, over-use of these home appliances can be detrimental to the environment. The younger generation clearly has a stronger belief in the impact of our daily habits on climate change, so perhaps as this subset of the population ages and forms their own families and households, they will make green decisions that help cut back on overall energy consumption.

What can you do? Opt for energy-efficient appliances when possible and make it standard practice to check-in with yourself and see if there are any small ways you can reduce energy usage in your home.

 

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