Lighting Terminology – Lumen

If you’ve shopped for lighting products recently, you’ll notice that the manufacturers  list an abundance of information about the color temperature, life, estimated yearly cost and lumens in addition to the wattage. Back in the day, only wattage was listed. Often, lumens and wattage gets confused or mistaken for each other, even though they are two completely different things.
The wattage of a bulb is defined as the amount of energy required to light a product. Lumens on the other hand is the measure of the total amount of visible light to the human eye, or a measure of brightness.

With the introduction and improvements to LED technology there is now a negative relationship between wattage and brightness.  For example, a 6.5W LED lamp will give a similar light output to a 50W Halogen bulb, which is 87% less energy for the same light output. As technology improves, more lumens will be produced with less WATT consumption.

While there is no set determined amount of lumens required for each room, its based on a matter of preference and usage, here’s a basic guide to figure out how many lumens you might want to have per room.

 

Type of Room Light Colored Decor Medium Colored Decor Dark Colored Decor
Kitchen
Bathroom
Den
Study
Workshop
56 Lumensper sq. ft 70 Lumens
per sq. ft
84 Lumens
per sq. ft
Bedroom
Living Room
Den
Family Room
Utility Room
42 Lumens
per sq. ft
56 Lumens
per sq. ft
70 Lumens
per sq. ft
Dining Room
Entertainment Area
Storage Room
Hallway
28 Lumens
per sq. ft
35 Lumens
per sq. ft.

42 Lumens
per sq. ft.

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